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A Guide To Balsam Fir Essential Oil and Its Benefits and Uses

Aromatherapy supplies with the words Guide To Balsam Fir Essential Oil Benefits and Uses and photo of balsam fir tree needles.

Balsam fir essential oil (Abies balsamea) is one of many varieties of fir needle essential oils. Balsam fir is also called Canadian fir and grows in Canada and the Northwestern United States.

Basic Balsam Fir Facts

Plant family: Pinaceae

Production: Steam distilled from the needles and twigs of the tree.  

Aroma: Woodsy, evergreen.

Perfume/Aromatic note: Middle to top.

Is balsam fir safe to use during pregnancy? Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition, states the evidence suggests this oil is not hazardous during pregnancy. However, consult a professional.

Is balsam fir essential oil safe for children? Yes, properly diluted, but avoid using with young babies.

Cautions: An oxidized oil may cause skin sensitization.

Main components:

  • beta-pinene        28.1–56.1%
  • delta-3-carene     0–27.3%
  • bornyl acetate      4.9–16.2%
  • alpha-pinene        6.2–14.3%
  • (+)-limonene        1.8–15.6%
  • beta-phellandrene 4.4–12.6%

Source: Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition

Balsam Fir Aromatherapy Benefits

Essential Living: Use balsam fir for cleansing and to help relieve colds and flu.

Plant Therapy: This essential oil is emotionally balancing, with an uplifting and also soothing effect. Use it to calm muscles and joints after a long day or intense workout. Balsam fir also helps support a healthy respiratory system when diffused or diluted in a carrier oil and rubbed on the chest.

Aromatics: Balsam fir helps create movement in the body — such as letting the breath flow more easily and easing restriction in muscles and joints to restore comfortable, natural mobility.
 
The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (updated edition): Balsam fir supports the respiratory system and may help relieve depression, nervous tension, and stress-related conditions.

Balsam Fir Essential Oil Uses and Recipes

In general, you can use fir oil in air fresheners, detergents, and household cleaners.

Balsam Fir and Pine Room Mist

  • 2 drops balsam fir essential oil
  • 12 drops pine essential oil
  • 1 teaspoon fractionated coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup distilled water
  • 2-ounce amber glass mist bottle

Add water and oils to the bottle. Replace lid and then shake until well blended. Spray mist into air as desired.
Source: Aura Cacia

Winter Steam Diffuser Blend

  • 5 drops black spruce essential oil
  • 5 drops balsam fir essential oil
  • 5 drops grapefruit essential oil
  1. Heat a small pan of water to a low simmer.
  2. Turn off the heat.
  3. Add the oils and let them diffuse with the steam from the heated water.

Gentle Back Rub Oil for Cough and Colds

  • 2 tablespoons jojoba oil
  • 3 drops Roman chamomile essential oil
  • 3 drops balsam fir essential oil
  • One 1-ounce glass or PET plastic bottle

Add jojoba to bottle. Drop in essential oils. Close bottle. Shake gently to mix.

To use: Shake gently. Rub some of the blend on the back of the neck and back before bedtime or as needed during the day.

Caution: Do not use on children under five. Source: Essential Living

Moisturizing Body Butter

Makes about four ounces.

  • 1.5 teaspoons beeswax
  • 2 tablespoons argan oil
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 25 drops balsam fir
  • 20 drops copaiba essential oil
  • 15 drops tangerine essential oil
  1. Prepare a double boiler over low heat.
  2. Add the beeswax and let melt.
  3. Stir in the coconut and argan oils until blended.
  4. Remove the blend from heat.
  5. Add your essential oils, stirring gently.
  6. Pour moisturizer into 4-ounce (120 ml) glass jar, and let it cool.

Source: Aromahead

Young Living Balsam Fir Essential Oil

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Photo Credit: Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / 1995., Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons