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A Guide To Cypress Essential Oil and Its Benefits and Uses

A Guide To Cypress Essential Oil and Its Benefits and Uses In Aromatherapy – Essential oil supplies and photo of cypress needles

Cypress essential oil "offers strength and energetic protection to those who need protecting, and those who are feeling vulnerable and insecure or have lost their purpose," writes aromatherapist Valerie Ann Worwood in Aromatherapy For the Soul.

Worwood also writes that the emotional benefits of cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) are to encourage balance, confidence, inner peace, comfort, change, understanding, wisdom, stability, patience, trust, and straightforwardness.

Basic Cypress Facts

Plant family: Cupressaceae

Production: Steam distilled from the needles of the cypress tree.

Aroma: Woody, warm, herbaceous.

Perfume/Aromatic note: Middle

Is cypress safe to use during pregnancy? Use only after the fifth month of pregnancy, according to Aromatherapy and Massage For Mother and Baby. However, both IFPA and Essential Oil Safety do not specify waiting until after 5 months. Yet, still other sources say to avoid cypress during pregnancy. Seek professional advice.

Is cypress essential oil safe for children? Do not use with babies.

Cautions: If the oil becomes oxidized, it may cause skin sensitization.

Main components:

  • alpha-pinene      20.4–52.7%
  • delta-3-carene   15.2–21.5%
  • cedrol                2.0–7.0%
  • alpha-terpinyl acetate  4.1–6.4%

Source: Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition

Benefits Of Cypress Essential Oil

Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide to the Healing Art: Cypress may help relieve oily skin and hair, dermatitis, excessive sweating, itching, skin injuries, skin growths, varicose veins, and cellulite. The essential oil may help lower blood pressure, improve poor circulation, and relieve hemorrhoids. Another use is in a gargle at the first sign of sore throat to help relieve laryngitis, spasmodic coughing, and lung congestion. The oil also helps ease anxiety, depression, grief, insomnia, nervousness, and helps people move on with their lives after emotional crisis.

The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy
: You can use cypress to help relieve congestive conditions, fluid retention, edema, heavy and tired legs, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, menstrual cramps, menopausal fatigue, hot flashes, cellulite, dry coughs, respiratory conditions, and rheumatism.

The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (updated edition): Cypress may help relieve hemorrhoids, oily and overhydrated skin, excessive perspiration, bleeding gums, varicose veins, wounds, muscle cramps, edema, poor circulation, rheumatism, asthma, spasmodic coughing, menstrual pain and other problems, menopausal problems, nervous tension, and stress-related conditions. You can also use the oil in an insect repellent blend.

Aromatherapy For Healing the Spirit
: In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the principal action of cypress is to enliven and regulate the flow of blood, making the oil useful for improving circulation and relieving menstrual problems. The oil's astringent nature also helps reduce excessive perspiration, making the oil a useful ingredient in deodorants. Emotionally, cypress oil can help you cope with and accept change.

Aromatica: A Clinical Guide to Essential Oil Therapeutics, Volume 2: Psychologically, cypress promotes self-confidence, motivation, willpower, and perseverance. Physically, the essential oil restores hypotonic/weak, decongests congestive/damp, and relaxes hypertonic/tense conditions. In Traditional Chinese Medicine the essential function of the oil is to tonify the Qi, activate Qi and Blood, and strengthen the Shen.

Subtle Aromatherapy: Cypress oil is helpful at times of transition, ranging from changing jobs to ending relationships to dealing with grief.

Aromatherapy and Subtle Energy Techniques: Cypress strengthens and comforts and helps you deal with change. The oil is particularly useful for the third chakra to promote confidence and patience and support the willingness to change.

Cypress Oil Uses and Recipes

Diffuse cypress essential oil to promote emotional balance. The scent is calming and energizing and can relieve feelings of anxiousness.

A few other ways to use this essential oil:

  • For cough relief, place 1 to 3 drops cypress on a tissue and inhale.

  • To reduce the pain of neuropathy and neuralgia: Blend 2 drops cypress oil, 2 drops rosemary oil, and 2 drops helichrysum oil into 1/2 teaspoon of  carrier oil. Rub on area of neuropathy.

  • Nourishing shampoo: Add 6 drops cypress and 6 drops helichrysum to an 8-ounce bottle of unscented shampoo. Mix thoroughly. Shampoo as usual.

  • Circulation-enhancing bath: Combine 5 drops cypress with 1 teaspoon coconut oil. Mix into 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) Epsom salt. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of the mixture to warm bath water.

Sources: Essential Oils Guide by Dr. Axe and 150 Ways to Use Essential Oils from Edens Garden.

Anxiety Relief Inhaler

Add drops directly to the blank cotton component of the aromatherapy inhaler. Attach lid securely. Use as needed.

Source: Essential Living

Massage Oils

Calming Massage Oil

  • 2 tablespoons carrier oil
  • 7 drops cypress
  • 7 drops lavender

Source: Cypress Essential Oil by aromatherapist KG Stiles

Muscle-Relaxing Massage Oil

  • 5 drops cypress essential oil
  • 3 drops marjoram essential oil
  • 3 drops lavender essential oil
  • 2 drops basil essential oil
  • 2 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons carrier oil, depending on how strong you want the blend

Adapted from Aromasense

Aura Cleansing Mist

Add the following essential oils to a 60-ml (2-ounce) mist bottle filled with distilled water:

  • 13 drops cypress     
  • 7 drops lemongrass
  • 7 drops lime  
  • 7 drops rosemary 

Adapted from 10 Recipes with Cypress.

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Photo Credit: 123RF.com